Corruption and the role of bystanders: What are the implications for whistleblowers?

“What are the implications for whistleblowers? It is important to recognise that denial of responsibility is a predictable human response. So rather than just condemning those who just sit by and do nothing to help, be prepared for this lack of response and take it into account in devising your course of action. Learn to decode the standard responses, realising that what people say is often an excuse for an instinctive avoidance of responsibility.”

— Brian Martin- Bystanders. Published in The Whistle (Newsletter of Whistleblowers Australia), No. 30, July 2002, pp. 10-11.

Full text available in the following URL: http://www.bmartin.cc/pubs/02whistle07.html

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Chaos Theory and Pharmacology

…”My thinking on this is inspired by a recent book by eminent sociologist Stanley Cohen, States of Denial: Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering (Polity Press, 2001). Cohen systematically analyses processes of denial by both individuals and governments. The book is impressive in its scope and insight. I can only introduce a few ideas from it here.

Cohen describes five methods of denial.

1. Deny responsibility: “I don’t know a thing about it.”

2. Deny injury: “It didn’t really cause any harm.”

3. Deny the victim: “They had it coming to them.”

4. Condemn the condemner: “They’re corrupt hypocrites.”

5. Appeal to higher loyalties: “I owe it to my mates.”… 

— Brian Martin- Bystanders. Published in The Whistle (Newsletter of Whistleblowers Australia), No. 30, July 2002, pp. 10-11.

Full text available in the following URL: http://www.bmartin.cc/pubs/02whistle07.html

Related posts in this blog – chaoticpharmacology.com

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  4 comments for “Corruption and the role of bystanders: What are the implications for whistleblowers?

  1. April 5, 2015 at 6:14 pm

    Esta interesante este artículo, sin embargo, lo que plantea que con aportar asi sea un grano de arena a instituciones como amnistía internacional u otras ONG hacemos parte de la solución es discutible.
    Ya que muchas de esas ONG son organizaciones que se usan para desestabilizar sociedades y no para ayudarlas como se pretende mostrar, pienso que se debe estar muy alerta a quien se colabora, pues podemos estar al contrario colaborando con los que hacen el mal.

    • April 5, 2015 at 6:29 pm

      Hola, el autor no recomienda esa posibilidad “aportar asi sea un grano de arena a instituciones como amnistía internacional u otras ONG hacemos parte de la solución es discutible.”

      Brian Martin se refiere a obtener ideas de esas organizaciones para romper la resistencia psicológica de los ‘bystanders’
      “Go get some leaflets from Amnesty or other human rights or charitable organisations and look at the ways they try to break through people’s psychological defences. Such groups have a lot of experience in promoting worthy causes. You can pick up some ideas for putting whistleblower stories on the agenda. And remember that the most you can hope for is that just a few people will become active. Bringing those few on board is a key to success.”

      Creo que un caso que ha logrado con éxito este proposito es el de Mark Markingson (mala conducta en investigación de la U. de Minnesota). http://chaoticpharmacology.com/2015/04/05/the-deadly-corruption-of-clinical-trials-via-pharmagossip-motherjones/

      • April 5, 2015 at 6:33 pm

        Bueno entendí mal, es cierto que en un principio muchas ONG se crearon y existen por iniciativas nobles, sin embargo, por su pantalla son usadas por persona no muy santas para sus malevolos fines.

    • April 5, 2015 at 6:34 pm

      Ahora, sobre el tema que planteas (ONG):

      Si estoy de acuerdo en que varias ONG pueden desestablizar sociedades y tener otros tipos de agendas ocultas. Sin embargo, también pienso que es importante no generalizar a las instituciones ni a las personas que trabajan para estas (por eso existimos los whistleblowers ;) ).

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